Renovations and New Business Projects in Baltimore

Baltimore is home to many recent renovation projects that have either been completed, continuing to be worked on, or are hopeful to have construction completed in the near future once all the regulatory requirements are met and approval is granted.

Hollins Market is one of those proposed projects because of its proximity to downtown, the Interstate 95 business corridor, the University of Maryland and its Biopark, the Baltimore Medical Center, Ravens Stadium, the Inner Harbor, and more. Plans to redesign Hollins Market came from the CEO of War Horse Cities, Scott Plank (http://warhorsecities.com/our-team/scott-plank-founder-ceo/).

Although it is a historic area, established in 1846, and named for the Hollins Family who owned the property during the early 19th century, major construction projects have decided that the surrounding commercial district has the potential to again be an economic and social hub.

The diverse neighborhood in Southwest Baltimore is very promising for development, especially with a large number of younger people who have moved in, who are mainly blue-collar workers, UMMC students, artists, and commuters. They are actively involved in working together to create a great community. For example, residents have turned empty lots into parks and green spaces. There is also a community association that sponsors music and movie nights, monthly walks, and a SoWeBo Arts and Music Festival on Memorial Day Weekend.

There is also a blossoming business district centered around the historic original Hollins Market from which the neighborhood gets its name. The Market itself is in the heart of the neighborhood and is the oldest Baltimore public market building that remains in use. It is a two-block-long 17,128-square-foot market structure consisting of market stalls, meeting rooms, and a civic auditorium. On adjacent streets, there are locally-owned restaurants and shops. Farmers have long needed a common meeting place and a destination for selling their wares, and today there are still six Baltimore City Public Markets that have evolved over the last two centuries.